Measure and Motivate the Right Contact Center Agent Behaviors

Increasingly banks must operate in a multi-channel environment.  While the changing role of the branch, combined with automated channels such as online and mobile, are getting a lot of attention, there remains a key role for the contact center in delivering an effective customer experience.  Central to this key role is designing an effective customer experience, comprised of the right sales and service behaviors – those which influence customer attitudes and behaviors in a profitable way yielding the most return on investment.

To provide direction with respect to what sales and service behaviors will yield the most return on investment, Kinesis conducted a series of mystery shops to identify which sales and service behaviors have the most influence on purchase intent. In addition to observing specific sales and service behaviors, mystery shoppers were also asked to rate how the call would have influenced their purchase intent if they had been a real customer. This purchase intent rating was then used as means of calculating the strength of the relationship between each behavior and purchase intent.

To determine the relationship between these service attributes and purchase intent, the data for these different studies was cross-tabulated by the purchase intent rating and subjected to significance testing. [i]

When the percentage of calls in which purchase intent significantly increased is tested against the percentage of calls where purchase intent significantly decreased, nearly all the sales and service attributes are statistically significant at or above a 95% confidence level.

 

Significantly Increased Significantly Decreased Test Statistic
Product knowledge 98% 35% 9.6
Explanations easy to understand 99% 45% 9.0
When thanked, respond graciously 98% 42% 8.5
Friendly demeanor / pleasant voice 100% 60% 8.4
Express appreciation for interest / thank you for business 92% 20% 8.3
Listen attentively 99% 60% 7.3
Ask probing questions 79% 10% 6.4
Offer further assistance 85% 25% 6.2
Speak clearly and avoid bank jargon 98% 68% 5.8
Listen attentively to your needs 80% 25% 5.3
Mention other bank product 99% 75% 5.3
Clear Greeting 95% 60% 5.1
Invite you to visit branch 64% 10% 4.6
Explain the value of banking with bank 57% 5% 4.4
Offer to mail material / mention website 66% 20% 4.3
Ask your name 68% 25% 3.8
Ask for your business / close the sale 57% 21% 2.9
Avoid interrupting 100% 95% 2.9
If no one available to assist you, offered options 100% 0% 2.2
Professional greeting 98% 89% 1.9

 

The differences between the highest and lowest purchase intent for product knowledge and ease to understanding explanations are the most significant, while a professional greeting is the least significant.

Dividing these behaviors into rough quartiles and comparing them side-by-side, reveals some interesting observations:

 

 

Quartile I

Product knowledge

Explanations easy to understand

When thanked, respond graciously

Friendly demeanor / pleasant voice

Express appreciation for interest / thank you for business

 

Quartile II

Listen attentively

Ask probing questions

Offer further assistance

Speak clearly and avoid bank jargon

When thanked, employee respond graciously

 

Quartile III

Listen attentively to your needs

Mention other bank product

Clear greeting

Invite you to visit branch

Explain the value of banking with bank

Offer to mail material / mention website

 

Quartile IV

Ask your name

Ask for your business / close the sale

Avoid interrupting

If no one available to assist you, offered options

Professional greeting

 

The attributes with the most significant differences between high and low purchase intent ratings appear to be those associated with reliability and empathy.  It appears mystery shoppers valued such “core” attributes as product knowledge or interest/enthusiasm for the customer.  They seem to be less concerned with more peripheral service attributes, such as asking for names, etc.  Influencing purchase intent is not as simple as merely using the customer’s name or answering the phone within a short period of time.  Rather it is a much more challenging undertaking of being competent in your job and having the customer’s best interests at heart.

[i] Significance testing determines if any differences observed are the result of actual differences in the populations measured rather than the result of normal variation.  Without getting into too much detail, significance testing produces a test statistic to determine the probability that differences observed are statistically significant.  A test statistic above 1.96 equates to a 95% confidence level, which means there is a 95% chance any differences observed are the result of actual differences in the populations measured rather than normal variation.  For all practical purposes a test statistic over 3.1 means there is 100% chance the differences observed are statistically significant (although in reality the probability never reaches 100%).  Finally, in interpreting the following analysis, it is important note that test statistics are not lineal.  A test statistic of two is not twice as significant as a test statistic of one.  The influence on significance decreases as the test statistic increases.  However, the test statistic does give us an opportunity to rank the service attributes by their statistical significance.


Click Here For More Information About Kinesis'; Bank Mystery Shopping


Click Here For More Information About Kinesis' Contact Center CX Research


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About Eric Larse

Eric Larse is co-founder of Seattle-based Kinesis CEM, LLC, which helps clients plan and execute their customer experience strategies through the intelligent use of customer satisfaction surveys and mystery shopping, linked with training and incentive programs. Visit Kinesis at: www.kinesis-cem.com

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