Implications of CX Consistency for Researchers – Part 1 – Inter-Channel Consistency

Previously, we discussed the business case and implications for customer experience mangers for inter-channel consistency.

This post considers the implications of cross-channel consistency for customer experience researchers.  The first research implication of inter-channel consistency is to understand that researchers must investigate service delivery consistency at its cause.

The range of choices available to customers here in the 21-st century is incredible.  Gone are the Henry Ford days when you, as he put it, “could have any color you want as long as it’s black.”  Modern customers have an array of choices available to them not only in the brands but in delivery channels.   Modern brands must serve channels in the channel of the customer’s choice, be it on-line, mobile, contact center, or in-person.   As customer choice expands cross-channel consistency has become more and more important.

The problem for customer experience researchers is that this channel expansion requires a broad tool box of research techniques, as different channels require unique systems and processes appropriate to the channel.  Systems and processes for on-line channels are different than those for in-person channels.  These different systems and processes often lead to the siloing of channels, which may help make individual channels more efficient, but run the risk in inconsistencies in the customer experience from one channel to the other.

Customers, however, don’t look at a brand as a collection of siloed channels.  Customers do not care about organizational charts.  They expect a consistent customer experience regardless of channels.  Customers expect cross-channel consistency.

If senior management has defined the customer experience organization-wide, the researcher’s role in coordinating research tools is much easier.  If management has not defined the customer experience organization-wide, the researcher’s role is nearly impossible.

Future posts will look at a variety of research tools to help manage consistency, research tools such as:

  • Control charts
  • Customer Journey Mapping
  • VOC Tables
  • Critical Incident Technique

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About Eric Larse

Eric Larse is co-founder of Seattle-based Kinesis CEM, LLC, which helps clients plan and execute their customer experience strategies through the intelligent use of customer satisfaction surveys and mystery shopping, linked with training and incentive programs. Visit Kinesis at: www.kinesis-cem.com

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