Tag Archive | Brand

Beyond Loyalty: Engagement/Wallet Share

In two earlier posts we discussed 1) including a loyalty proxy as part of your brand perception research and 2) determining the extent to which your desired brand image is reflected in how customers actually perceive the brand.

Now, we expand the research plan to move beyond loyalty and brand perception, and investigate customer engagement, or the extent to which customers are engaged with the brand through share of wallet.

Wallet Share

Comparison to Competitors

The first step in measuring customer engagement is capturing top-of-mind comparisons of your brand to competitors.  There are many ways to achieve this research objective, perhaps the simplest is to present the respondent with a list of statements regarding the 4-P’s of marketing (product, promotion, place and price) and asking customers to compare your performance relative to your competitors.

The statements you present to customers should be customized around your industry and business objectives, but they may look something like the following:

  • Their products and services are competitive
  • They are more customer-centric
  • They have lower fees
  • They have better service
  • They offer better technology
  • They are more nimble and flexible
  • They are more innovative

Similar to the brand perception statements discussed in the previous post, these competitor comparison statements can be used to determine which of these service attributes have the most potential for ROI in terms of driving loyalty, again, by cross tabulating responses to the customer loyalty proxy.

Primary Provider

The next step in researching customer engagement is to determine if the customer considers you or another brand their primary provider.  This is easily achieved by presenting the customer with a list of providers, including yourself, and asking them which of these the customer consider their primary provider.

Finally, we can tie industry comparisons to primary provider by asking why they consider their selection as a primary provider.  This is best accomplished by using the same list of competitor comparison statements above, and asking which of these statements are the reasons they consider their selection to be the primary provider.

Similar to the brand perception statements discussed in the previous post, these competitor comparison statements can be used to determine which of these service attributes have the most potential for ROI in terms of driving loyalty, by cross-tabulating responses to these statements to the loyalty segments.

 

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Image/Perception: A Mirror to Your Brand

In an earlier post we discussed including a loyalty proxy as part of your brand perception research.

Establishing and measuring loyalty proxies is important, but your brand perception research should not end there.  Brand perception research should produce insight beyond loyalty.  It should determine the extent to which customers impressions of the brand are aligned with your desired brand image.  Additionally, perceptions of the brand among the most loyal and engaged customers should be compared to those who are deemed less loyal or engaged to identify opportunities to improve perceptions of the brand among customers at either risk of defection, or not fully engaged

In a subsequent post, we will address ways to measure engagement/wallet share.

Brand Definition

The first step in measuring your brand perception is to define your desired brand.  Ask yourself: if your brand were a person, what personality characteristics would you like your customers to describe you with?  What adjectives would you want used to describe your brand?

In addition to describing your brand personality with adjectives, come up with a list of statements that describe your desired personality.  For example, you may include statements such as:

  • We are easy to do business with.
  • We are knowledgeable.
  • We are like a trusted friend.
  • We are interested in customers as people, not just the bottom line.
  • We are committed to the community.

So, we defined the brand in terms of personality adjectives and statements.  Both will be used in designing the survey instrument.

The Survey Instrument

Unaided Top-of Mind

The first step in the survey instrument, is asking customers for their unaided top-of-mind perceptions of the brand.  This will uncover the first thing that comes to customers’ minds about your brand prior to the effects of any bias introduced by the research instrument itself.  There are many ways to capture unaided top-of-mind impressions.  We like a simple approach, where you ask the customer for the one word that they would use to describe the company.  This research question will yield a list adjectives that can be quantified by frequency and used to determine the extent to which customers top-of-mind impressions match the desired brand image.

Aided Image

After we have defined top of mind impressions of the brand, we recommend comparing brand perception to your desired brand identified in the brand definition exercise described above.  This is a fairly simple process of presenting the customers with your list of brand personality adjectives and asking the customer which of these adjectives would the customer use to describe the company.

In a much earlier post we discussed using word clouds to interpret brand personality adjectives.

The next step in comparing the reality of brand perception to your branding goals is to ask the customers to what extent do they agree with each of the brand personality statements described above.  As with the list of adjectives, this holds a mirror up to your desired image and measures the extent to which customers agree that you are perceived in the manner that you want to be.

Identifying Attributes with the Most ROI Potential

The value of these brand perception statements goes beyond just evaluating if you live up to your brand.  Used in conjunction with the loyalty proxies discussed in the previous post, they become tools to determine which of these brand personality attributes will yield the most ROI in terms of improving customer loyalty.  This is achieved with a simple cross-tabulation of agreement with these statements by customer loyalty segment.  For example, if NPS is used as the loyalty proxy, then we simply compare agreement to these statements from promoters to detractors to determine which attributes have the largest gaps between promoters and detractors.  Those with the largest gaps have the most ROI potential in terms of customer loyalty.

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Loyalty: The Foundation of Brand Perception

Customer loyalty is the business attribute with the strongest correlation to profitability. Loyalty lowers sales and acquisition costs per customer by amortizing these costs across a longer lifecycle, leading to extraordinary financial results. A 5% increase in customer loyalty can translate, depending on the industry, into a 25% to 85% increase in profits.

ROI

Many customer experience managers want to include a measure of loyalty in their customer experience research.  Indeed loyalty and how brand perception drives loyalty is the foundation of any brand perception research.  However, loyalty is a behavior measured longitudinally over time, and surveys best measure customer attitudes.  As a result, researchers typically use attitudinal proxies for customer loyalty.  Generally the two most common proxies are either a “would recommend” or a “customer advocacy” question.

  1. Would Recommend:   A “would recommend” question is typically Net Promoter (NPS) or some other measure of the customer’s likelihood of referring to a friend, relative or colleague.  It stands to reason, if one is going to refer others to a brand, they will remain loyal as well.  Promoters’ willingness to put their reputational risk on the line is founded on a feeling of loyalty and trust.
  1. Customer Advocacy: A customer advocacy question asks if the customer agrees with the following statement, “the brand cares about me, not just the bottom line.”  The concept of trust is perhaps more evident in customer advocacy.  Customers who agree with this statement trust the brand to do right by them, and not subjugate their best interests to profits.  Customers who trust the brand to do the right thing are more likely to remain loyal.

We’ve seen some loyalty surveys (particular those employing the NPS methodology), which only ask the loyalty proxy with little or no other areas of investigation.  We believe this is a bad practice for a number of reasons:

  1. Customer Experience: Customers who have affirmatively taken the action of clicking on the survey want to give you their opinion (they want to participate in the survey), and based on their experience are expecting a multiple question survey.  Presenting them with just one rating scale risks alienating them as they may feel they didn’t get an appropriate opportunity to share their opinion, and ultimately feel it was not worth their time to participate.  Secondly, some customers may conclude the survey system is broken in some way as it only presented them with one question, resulting in customer confusion.
  1. Actionable Research Results: A survey consisting of one NPS rating is not going to yield any information from which to draw conclusions about how customers feel about the brand.  It will produce an average rating and frequency of promoters and detractors, but no context in which to interpret the results.

Establishing and measuring loyalty proxies are an important first step in evaluating brand perception.  Additional areas of investigation should include indentifying and comparing customer impressions of the brand to your desired brand personality, and evaluate customer engagement or wallet share.

 

In a subsequent post, we will address ways to measure the brand personality.

Also, in a subsequent post, we will explore ways to measure engagement/wallet share.

 

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Build Call to Action into Your Brand Perception Research

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These days, post-transaction surveys are ubiquitous.  Brands large and small take advantage of internet-based survey technology to evaluate the customer experience at almost every touch point.  Similarly, loyalty proxy methodologies such as Net Promoter (NPS) are very much in vogue.  However, many NPS surveys are fielded in a post-transaction context (potentially exposing the research to sampling bias as a result of only hearing from customers who have recently conducted a transaction), and are not designed in a manner that will give managers appropriate information upon which to take action on the research.

At their core, loyalty proxies are brand perception research – not transactional.  We believe it is a best practice to define the sample frame as the entire customer base, as opposed to customers who have recently interacted with the brand.  Ultimately, these surveys are image and perception research of the brand across the entire customer base.

Happily, this perception research offers an excellent opportunity to gather customer perceptions of the brand, compare them to your desired brand image, as well as measure engagement or wallet share.  An excellent survey instrument to accomplish this is a survey divided into three parts:

  • Loyalty Proxy: Consisting of the NPS rating or some other appropriate measure and 1 or 2 follow up questions to explore why the customer gave the NPS rating they did.
  • Image perception: consisting of 3 or 4 questions to determine how customers perceive the brand.
  • Engagement/Wallet Share: consisting of 3 or 4 questions to determine if the customer considers the brand their primary provider, and to gauge share of wallet of various financial products & services across the brand and its competitors.

This research plan will not only yield an NPS, but it will provide insight into why the customers assigned the NPS they did, evaluate the extent to which the entire customer base’s impressions of the brand matches your desired brand image, as well as identify how the brand is perceived by promoters and detractors. This plan will also yield valuable insight into share of wallet, and how wallet share differs for promoters and detractors.

Such a survey need not be long, the above objectives can be accomplished with 10 – 12 questions and will probably take less than 5 minutes for the customer to complete.

In a subsequent posts, we will explore each of these 3-parts of the survey in more detail:

 

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Emotional States and Problem Resolution

Previously we discussed the concept of “moments of truth” where some experiences in the customer journey have far greater importance than others. These moments of truth represent increased risk and opportunity to leave a lasting emotional impression on the customer; a lasting impression with significant long-term implications for both customer loyalty and wallet share. Perhaps the most common moment of truth is when something has gone wrong, the customer is unhappy or scared and the relationship is at risk. These events could be the result of: service delivery failures (unavailable service, unreasonably slow service, or other core service failures); customer needs and requests (special customer needs or customer preferences); or an adverse outcome (loan denial or loss of investment principal).

Also, in an earlier post we introduced a model to define emotional states with two dimensions:
1) valence (the extent to which the emotional state is positive or negative) and
2) arousal (the extent to which the energy mobilization of the emotional state is experienced on a scale of active to passive or aroused to calm).

Arousal Valence Quadrants

Together, valence and arousal can define all human emotions. States of high arousal and positive valence are excited or happy; low arousal and negative valence are bored or depressed; while states of positive valence and low arousal are calm and relaxed, and negative valence and high arousal are angry or frustrated.

Not surprisingly, people are motivated to maintain positive moods, and mitigate negative affective states. People in negative affective states desire choices that have the potential to change or, in particular, improve their moods. For example, researchers have demonstrated a preference for TV shows that held the greatest promise of providing relief from negative affective states. People in a sad mood want to be comforted; anxious people want to feel control and safety.

Beyond solving the problem, the objective in dealing with an upset customer is to help relieve their negative affective state. If they are angry, attempt to calm them; if anxious, provide comfort. Time and time again, our research across many brands reveals that beyond resolving their problem as efficiently as possible, what customers want is empathy and reliability. We want to talk to someone who both understands how we feel and is reliable. They both have a solution to the problem and what they say will get done, gets done.

Strategies in CX Design

Anticipate potential needs for recovery: In designing tools to monitor the customer experience, managers must be aware of potential moments of truth and design tools to monitor these critical points in the customer journey. Some of these tools include: monitoring customer comments from comment cards or online forms to identify instances where the customer is either extremely happy or dissatisfied; monitor social media to identify common causes of moments of truth; survey tracking specifically focusing on the responses from dissatisfied customers; and mystery shopping to test the response to specific problem scenarios.

Decentralize decision making & empower front-line employees: In empowering frontline employees to serve customers, brands should arm them with statements of general principles and values rather than scripted procedures, which undermine empowerment. Reinforce these principles often so in the moment, when they are in a moment of truth with a customer in need, they have an appropriate framework from which to resolve the issue – and bond the customer to the brand.

Train the frontline: Training the frontline to handle problem resolution requires training not just in decision making, but also emotional intelligence. Can emotional intelligence be taught? Yes, but it requires a unique approach of self-discovery. Self-discovery is not a top-down process, however. Managers can foster it through feedback, encouragement to reflect on their own successes and failures, and anecdotes about other employees.

Specifically, tactics frontline employees can employ to handle upset customers include:

• Acknowledging the problem;
• Empathize;
• Apologize;
• Own the problem;
• Fix the problem;
• Provide assurance; and
• Provide compensation.

Customers experiencing a problem want to change their negative affective state. When dealing with an upset customer it is incumbent on the frontline to help relieve this negative state. Time and time again, in research study after research study, Kinesis finds that the two service attributes that influence customers in a positive way when they encounter a problem are empathy and reliability. Customers want to interact with employees who understand their feelings and are able to resolve the problem.

 

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Emotional Role in Sales & Acquisitions

Previously we discussed the concept of “moments of truth” where some experiences in the customer journey have far greater importance than others. These moments of truth represent increased risk and opportunity to leave a lasting emotional impression on the customer; a lasting impression with significant long-term implications for both customer loyalty and wallet share. The purchase and sales experience is one such moment of truth. One study published in McKinsey Quarterly has determined that the purchase experience of financial services motivated 85% bank customers to purchase more financial products or invest more assets with the institution. (Beaujean et al 06)

We also introduced the concept of defining emotions using two dimensions of mood: valence (positive or negative) and arousal. Again, as we previously observed, modern research into brain activity during the decision process suggests that decisions are made within the brain before we are consciously of them. Emotions provide a short cut to acting on decisions, and rational thought appears to justify decisions after they are made on the subconscious level.

So…given that emotions play a key role in financial decisions, what are the emotions bankers encounter as part of the sales experience?

The emotions financial service customers experience vary by customer, financial need, circumstance and product/service sought, however the emotions a prospective customer may experience include:

• Excited
• Convinced
• Enthusiastic
• Expectant
• Hopeful
• At Ease/Satisfied
• Distressed
• Anxious

These emotions map to the valance and arousal dimensions as follows:
Arousal_Valence_Map_Sales_Emotions

So…what do we do with this enlightenment?

First, knowing that people are motivated to maintain positive emotional states and change/mitigate negative emotional states, it is important for the banker to recognize the prospective customer’s emotional motivation and offer solutions which will achieve either of these ends.

Kinesis has conducted research into purchase intent as the result of financial service sales presentation which may be instructive. Click here for this research.

Time and time again, in study after study, we consistently observe that purchase intent is driven by two dimensions of the customer experience: reliability and empathy. Customers want bankers who care about them and their needs and have the ability to satisfy those needs. Specifically, our research suggests the following behaviors are strongly related to purchase intent:

 

Empathy

Interest in Helping

Discuss Benefits & Solutions

Personalized Comment

Listen Attentively

Express Appreciation

Reliability

Promised Services Get Done

Accuracy

Friendly & Courteous

Professionalism

 

Both empathy and reliability require employees with Emotional Intelligence.  These are employees with a positive outlook and a, strong sense of self-empowerment; self regulation; awareness of feelings (both their own and customers); master of fear and anxiety and the ability to tap into selfless motives.

Sales presentations are moments of truth with the potential to leave a lasting impression on the customer with significant long-term implications for both customer loyalty and wallet share – with obvious financial benefits for the institution.  We’ve found that branches with above average frequencies of behaviors associated with reliability and empathy experienced a 26% stronger three-year branch deposit growth rate than branches with low frequencies of these behaviors.

Next, we’ll take a look at moments of truth in the context of problem resolution.

 

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Mood Effects on the Customer Experience

Customers experience all aspects of their relationship with a brand through the lens of their emotional state. Be they happy, excited, depressed or angry all brands must be prepared to meet each customer in their specific emotional state. It’s a challenge – but also an opportunity. Ultimately, loyalty is emotionally driven. Brands that can react to and manage customer emotions stand to reap the rewards of customer loyalty.

To understand the role of the customer’s mood in managing the customer experience, it is instructive to consider how two affective states work together to define mood. The following model tracks mood across valence (the extent to which the emotional state is positive or negative) and arousal (the extent to which the energy mobilization of the emotional state is experienced on a scale of active to passive or aroused to calm).

Arousal Valence Quadrants

Together, these affective states of valence and arousal can define all human emotions. States of positive valence and high arousal are excited or happy; negative valence and low arousal are bored or depressed. States of positive valence and low arousal are calm and relaxed, and negative valence and high arousal are angry or frustrated.

Here is a detailed map of a variety of emotions across these two dimensions.

Map of Emotions to Valence & Arousal

Research has determined that, not surprisingly, people are motivated to maintain positive moods, and mitigate negative affective states. When feeling good we tend to make choices that maintain a positive mood. Customers in a positive mood are more loyal, and more likely to interpret information favoring a current brand. Meanwhile, people in negative affective states make choices that have the potential to change or, in particular, improve their moods. For example, researchers have demonstrated a preference for TV shows that held the greatest promise of providing relieve from negative affective states. People in a sad mood want to be comforted, anxious people want to feel control and safety.

Key to maintaining positive moods is arousal or more specifically the management of arousal. Let’s take a look at how arousal management influences consumer choice. Consumers in a positive mood prefer products congruent with their state of arousal. Excited or happy consumers want to stay excited or happy, while relaxed and calm consumers what to stay relaxed and calm. Consumers in a negative mood prefer products with the potential to change their level of arousal. For example, in an experiment, participants were offered the choice of an energy drink or iced tea. The following chart illustrates participant’s preference by the state of arousal and valence:

Tea_Energy_Drink_Preference

Participants in a positive mood, preferred the drink congruent with their level of arousal, those in a positive low-arousal state preferred iced tea, and those in a positive high-arousal state preferred an energy drink. On the other hand, those in a negative mood preferred a drink incongruent with their energy state, those in a negative low-arousal state preferred an energy drink, and those in a negative high-arousal state preferred iced tea.

Understanding the role of arousal management in customers’ innate desire to maintain positive moods and mitigate negative moods has far reaching implications for just about every element of the customer experience from sales, to problem resolution, to customer experience design, hiring, training and customer experience measurement. In future posts we will explore these implications for each of these elements of the customer experience.

 

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