Tag Archive | how to increase customer loyalty

Key Driver Analysis: Drive Your Core Customer Experience Objectives

Mystery shopping not in pursuit of an overall customer experience objective may be interesting, it may be successful in motivating certain service behaviors, but ultimately will fail in maximizing return on investment.

Consider the following proposition:

“Every time a customer interacts with a brand, the customer learns something about the brand, and based on what they learn, adjust their behavior in either profitable or unprofitable ways.”

These behavioral adjustments could be profitable: positive word of mouth, complain less, less expensive channel use, increased wallet share, loyalty, or purchase intent, etc..  Or…these adjustments could be unprofitable: negative word of mouth, more complaints, decreased wallet share, purchase intent or loyalty, etc.

There is power in this proposition.  Understanding it is the key to managing the customer experience in a profitable way.  Unlocking this power gives managers a clear objective for the customer experience in terms of what you want the customer to learn from it and react to it.  Ultimately, it becomes a guidepost for all aspects of customer experience management – including customer experience measurement.

In designing customer experience measurement tools, ask yourself:

  • What is the overall objective of the customer experience?
  • How do you want the customer to feel as a result of the experience?
  • How do you want the customer to act as a result of the experience?

For example:

  • Do you want the customer to have increased purchase intent?
  • Do you want the customer to have increased return intent?
  • Do you want the customer to have increased loyalty?

The answer to the above series of questions will become the guideposts for designing a customer experience which will achieve your objectives.

The answers to the above questions will serve as a basis for evaluating the customer experience against your objectives.   In research terms, the answer to this question or questions will become the dependent variable(s) of your customer experience research – the variables influenced or dependent on the specific attributes of the customer experience.

For example, let’s assume your objective of the customer experience is increased return intent.  As part of a mystery shopping program, ask a question designed to capture return intent – a question like, “Had this been an actual visit, how did the experience during this shop influence your intent to return for another transaction?”  This is the dependent variable.

The next step is to determine the relationship between every service behavior or attribute and the dependent variable (return intent).  The strength of this relationship is a measure of the importance of each behavior or attribute in terms of driving return intent.  It provides a basis from which to make informed decisions as to which behaviors or attributes deserve more investment in terms of training, incentives, and rewards.

This is what Kinesis calls Key Driver Analysis, an analysis technique designed to identify service behaviors and attributes which are key drivers of your key objectives of the customer experience.   In the end, providing an informed basis for which to make decisions about investments in the customer experience.
Mystery_Shopping_Page

 

Two Questions….Lots of Insights: Turn Customer Experience Observations into Valuable Insight

Customer experience researchers are constantly looking for ways to make their observations relevant, to turn observations into insight. Observing a behavior or service attribute is one thing, linking observations to insight that will maximize return on customer experience investments is another. One way to link customer experience observations to insights that will drive ROI is to explore the influence of customer experience attributes to key business outcomes such as loyalty and wallet share.

The first step is to gather impressions of a broad array of customer experience attributes, such as: accuracy, cycle time, willingness to help, etc. Make this list as long as you reasonably can without making the survey instrument too long.

For additional thoughts on survey length and research design, see the following blog posts:

Click Here: Maximizing Response Rates: Get Respondents to Complete the Survey

Click Here: Keys to Customer Experience Research Success – Start with the Objectives

The next step is to explore the relationship of these service attributes to loyalty and share of wallet.

Two Questions – Lots of Insight

In our experience, two questions: a “would recommend” and primary provider question, yield valuable insight into the relative importance of specific service attributes. Together, these two questions form the foundation of a two-dimensional analytical framework to determine the relative importance of specific service attributes in driving loyalty and wallet share.

Loyalty Question

Research has determined the business attribute with the highest correlation to profitability is customer loyalty. Customer loyalty lowers sales and acquisition costs per customer by amortizing these costs across a longer lifetime – leading to some extraordinary financial results.

Measuring customer loyalty in the context of a survey is difficult. Surveys best measure attitudes and perceptions. Loyalty is a behavior not an attitude. Survey researchers therefore need to find a proxy measurement to determine customer loyalty. A researcher might measure customer tenure under the assumption that length of relationship predicts loyalty. However, customer tenure is a poor proxy. A customer with a long tenure may leave, or a new customer may be very satisfied and highly loyal.

Likelihood of referral captures a measurement of the customer’s likelihood to refer a brand to a friend, relative or colleague. It stands to reason, if one is going to refer others to a brand, they will remain loyal as well, because customers who are promoters of a brand are putting their reputational risk on the line. This willingness to put their reputational risk on the line is founded on a feeling of loyalty and trust.

Any likelihood of referral question can be used, depending on the specifics of your objectives. Kinesis has had success with both a “yes/no” question, “Would you refer us to a friend, relative or colleague?” and the Net Promoter methodology. The Net Promoter methodology asks for a rating of the likelihood of referral to a friend, relative or colleague on an 11-point (0-10) scale. Customers with a likelihood of 0-6 are labeled “detractors,” those with ratings of 7 and 8 and identified as “passive referrers,” while those who assign a rating of 9 and 10 are labeled “promoters.”

In our experience asking the “yes/no” question: “Would you refer us to a friend, relative or colleague?” produces starker differences in this two-dimensional analysis making it easier to identify which service attributes have a stronger relationship to both loyalty and engagement.

Engagement Question

Similar to loyalty, customer engagement or wallet share can lead to some extraordinary financial results. Wallet share is the percentage of what a customer spends with a given brand over a specific period of time.

Also similar to loyalty, measuring engagement or wallet share in a survey is difficult. There are several ways to measure engagement: one methodology is to use some formula such as the Wallet Allocation Rule which uses customer responses to rank brands in the same product category and employs this rank to estimate wallet share, or to use a simple yes/no primary provider question.

Methodology

Using these loyalty and engagement measures together, we can now cross tabulate the array of service attribute ratings by these two measures. This cross tabulation groups the responses into four segments: 1) Engaged & Loyal, 2) Disengaged yet Loyal, 3) Engaged yet Disloyal, 4) Disengaged & Disloyal. We can now make comparisons of the responses by these four segments to gain insight into how each of these four segments experience their relationship with the brand.

These four segments represent: the ideal, opportunity, recovery and attrition.

Loyalty Engagement_2

Ideal – Engaged Promoters: This is the ideal customer segment. These customers rely on the brand for the majority of their in category purchases and represent lower attrition risk. In short, they are perfectly positioned to provide the financial benefits of customer loyalty. Comparing attribute ratings for customers in this segment to the others will identify both areas of strength, but at the same time, identify attributes which are less important in terms of driving this ideal state, informing future decisions on investment in these attributes.

Opportunity – Disengaged Promoter: This customer segment represents an opportunity. These customers like the brand and are willing to put their reputation at risk for it. However, there is an opportunity for cross-sell to improve share of wallet. Comparing attribute ratings of the opportunity segment to the ideal will identify service attributes with the highest potential for ROI in terms of driving wallet share.

Recovery – Engaged Detractor: This segment represents significant risk. The combination of above average share of wallet, and low commitment to put their reputational risk on the line is flat out dangerous as it puts profitable share of wallet at risk. Comparing attribute ratings of customers in the recovery segment to both the ideal and the opportunity segments will identify the service attributes with the highest potential for ROI in terms of improving loyalty.

Attrition – Disengaged Detractor: This segment represents the greatest risk of attrition. With no willingness to put reputational risk on the line, and little commitment to placing share of wallet with the brand, retention strategies may be too late for them. Additionally, they most likely are unprofitable. Comparing the service attributes of customers in this segment to the others will identify elements of the customer experience which drive attrition and may warrant increased investment, as well as, elements that do not appear to matter very much in terms driving runoff, and may not warrant investment.

By making comparisons across each of these segments, researchers give managers a basis to make informed decisions about which service attributes have the strongest relationship to loyalty and engagement. Thus identifying which behaviors have the highest potential for ROI in terms of driving customer loyalty and engagement. This two-dimensional analysis is one way to turn customer experience observations into insight.

Click Here For More Information About Kinesis' Research Services

Emotional Role in Sales & Acquisitions

Previously we discussed the concept of “moments of truth” where some experiences in the customer journey have far greater importance than others. These moments of truth represent increased risk and opportunity to leave a lasting emotional impression on the customer; a lasting impression with significant long-term implications for both customer loyalty and wallet share. The purchase and sales experience is one such moment of truth. One study published in McKinsey Quarterly has determined that the purchase experience of financial services motivated 85% bank customers to purchase more financial products or invest more assets with the institution. (Beaujean et al 06)

We also introduced the concept of defining emotions using two dimensions of mood: valence (positive or negative) and arousal. Again, as we previously observed, modern research into brain activity during the decision process suggests that decisions are made within the brain before we are consciously of them. Emotions provide a short cut to acting on decisions, and rational thought appears to justify decisions after they are made on the subconscious level.

So…given that emotions play a key role in financial decisions, what are the emotions bankers encounter as part of the sales experience?

The emotions financial service customers experience vary by customer, financial need, circumstance and product/service sought, however the emotions a prospective customer may experience include:

• Excited
• Convinced
• Enthusiastic
• Expectant
• Hopeful
• At Ease/Satisfied
• Distressed
• Anxious

These emotions map to the valance and arousal dimensions as follows:
Arousal_Valence_Map_Sales_Emotions

So…what do we do with this enlightenment?

First, knowing that people are motivated to maintain positive emotional states and change/mitigate negative emotional states, it is important for the banker to recognize the prospective customer’s emotional motivation and offer solutions which will achieve either of these ends.

Kinesis has conducted research into purchase intent as the result of financial service sales presentation which may be instructive. Click here for this research.

Time and time again, in study after study, we consistently observe that purchase intent is driven by two dimensions of the customer experience: reliability and empathy. Customers want bankers who care about them and their needs and have the ability to satisfy those needs. Specifically, our research suggests the following behaviors are strongly related to purchase intent:

 

Empathy

Interest in Helping

Discuss Benefits & Solutions

Personalized Comment

Listen Attentively

Express Appreciation

Reliability

Promised Services Get Done

Accuracy

Friendly & Courteous

Professionalism

 

Both empathy and reliability require employees with Emotional Intelligence.  These are employees with a positive outlook and a, strong sense of self-empowerment; self regulation; awareness of feelings (both their own and customers); master of fear and anxiety and the ability to tap into selfless motives.

Sales presentations are moments of truth with the potential to leave a lasting impression on the customer with significant long-term implications for both customer loyalty and wallet share – with obvious financial benefits for the institution.  We’ve found that branches with above average frequencies of behaviors associated with reliability and empathy experienced a 26% stronger three-year branch deposit growth rate than branches with low frequencies of these behaviors.

Next, we’ll take a look at moments of truth in the context of problem resolution.

 

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Customer Loyalty Is an Illusion

A colleague of mine is fond of saying there is no such thing as customer loyalty. He argues loyalty…true loyalty…loyalty through thick and thin – requires an irrational customer, one who will stay with you regardless of the outcome.

The fact of the matter is customers are rational. What we perceive as loyalty is an illusion, rather it is actually the product of an ongoing calculation each customer makes to either initiate or maintain a relationship with a provider. This is the customer value equation.

Customer Value Equation

The customer value equation is simply the ratio of the benefits of a product or service over the costs of the product or service. If this ratio is greater than 1, the customer will act as if they are loyal. If this ratio is less than 1, the customer will behave as if they are disloyal.

The numerator in this equation contains all the possible benefits associated with the product or service. These include the obvious, such as the quality of the results and the process quality. However, they also include less obvious intangible benefits. The owner of a luxury car, for example, may perceive an intangible benefit of status associated with this luxury vehicle.

The denominator contains the sum of all the costs associated with the product or service. Again, the obvious costs are price. However, there may be other acquisition costs, such as installation or maintenance. Additionally, this should include intangible costs such as potential risk of switching.

As customer experience researchers, we are constantly considering the customer value equation to provide context from which to interpret our research.

Furthermore, understanding the customer value equation gives managers a rational framework to make investments in product, positioning, price and place to best match their offering with their customers’ value equation.

How might a manager use the concept of the customer value equation to manage the customer experience?


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